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P ELECTRICAL SAFETY

THE BUILDING REGULATIONS 2000

Use of guidance

THE APPROVED DOCUMENTS

This document is one of a series that has been approved and issued by the Secretary of State for the purpose of providing practical guidance with respect to the requirements of Schedule 1 to and regulation 7 of the Building Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/2531) for England and Wales. SI 2000/2531 has been amended by the Building (Amendment) Regulations 2001 (SI 2001/3335), the Building (Amendment) Regulations 2002 (SI 2002/440), the Building (Amendment) (No 2)

Regulations 2002 (SI 2002/2871), the Building

(Amendment) Regulations 2003 (SI 2003/2692), the Building (Amendment) Regulations 2004 (SI 2004/1465) and the Building (Amendment) (No

3) Regulations (SI 2004/3210).

At the back of this document is a list of all

the documents that have been approved and issued by the Secretary of State for this

purpose.

Approved Documents are intended to provide guidance for some of the more common

building situations. However, there may well be alternative ways of achieving compliance with the requirements. Thus there is no obligation

to adopt any particular solution contained in an Approved Document if you prefer to meet the relevant requirement in some other way.

Supplementary guidance

The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister

occasionally issues additional material to aid interpretation of the guidance contained in

Approved Documents. This material may be

conveyed in official letters to Chief Executives of Local Authorities and Approved Inspectors and/or posted on the web sites accessed

through: http://www.odpm.gov.uk/building- regulations.

Other requirements

The guidance contained in an Approved Document relates only to the particular

requirements of the Regulations which the document addresses. The building work will

also have to comply with the requirements of

any other relevant paragraphs in Schedule 1 to the Regulations.

There are Approved Documents which give guidance on each of the Parts of Schedule 1 and on Regulation 7.

LIMITATION ON REQUIREMENTS

In accordance with regulation 8, the

requirements in Parts A to D, F to K, N and P

(except for paragraphs H2 and J6) of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations do not require

anything to be done except for the purpose of securing reasonable standards of health and

safety for persons in or about buildings (and

any others who may be affected by buildings or matters connected with buildings). This is one of the categories of purpose for which Building Regulations may be made.

Paragraphs H2 and J6 are excluded from regulation 8 because they deal directly with

prevention of the contamination of water. Parts E and M (which deal, respectively, with

resistance to the passage of sound, and

access to and use of buildings) are excluded from regulation 8 because they address the

welfare and convenience of building users. Part L is excluded from regulation 8 because it

addresses the conservation of fuel and power. All these matters are amongst the purposes, other than health and safety, that may be

addressed by Building Regulations.

MATERIALS AND WORKMANSHIP

Any building work which is subject to the requirements imposed by Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations should, in accordance

with regulation 7, be carried out with proper materials and in a workmanlike manner.

You may show that you have complied with regulation 7 in a number of ways. These

include the appropriate use of a product

bearing CE marking in accordance with the

Construction Products Directive (89/106/EEC)1, the Low Voltage Directive (73/23/EEC and

amendment 93/68/EEC)2 and the EMC Directive (89/336/EEC)3, as amended by the CE marking Directive (93/68/EEC)4, or a product complying with an appropriate technical specification (as defined in those Directives), a British Standard, or an alternative national technical

specification of any state which is a

contracting party to the European Economic Area which, in use, is equivalent, or a product covered by a national or European certificate issued by a European Technical Approval

issuing body, and the conditions of use are in accordance with the terms of the certificate. You will find further guidance in the Approved Document supporting regulation 7 on materials and workmanship.

1 As implemented by the Construction Products Regulations 1991 (SI 1991 No 1620)

2 As implemented by the Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 1994 (SI 1994 No 3260)

3 As implemented by the Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulations 1992 (SI 1992 No 2372)

4 As implemented by the Construction Products (Amendment) Regulations 1994 (SI 1994 No 3051) and the Electromagnetic Compatibility (Amendment) Regulations 1994 (SI 1994 No 3080)

Independent certification schemes

There are many UK product certification

schemes. Such schemes certify compliance with the requirements of a recognised

document which is appropriate to the purpose for which the material is to be used. Materials which are not so certified may still conform to a relevant standard.

Many certification bodies which approve such schemes are accredited by UKAS.

Technical specifications

Under section 1(1)(a) of the Building Act 1984, Building Regulations may be made for various purposes including health, safety, welfare,

convenience, conservation of fuel and power and prevention of contamination of water.

Standards and technical approvals are relevant guidance to the extent that they relate to these considerations. However, they may also

address other aspects of performance such as serviceability, or aspects which, although they relate to the purposes listed above, are not

covered by the current Regulations.

When an Approved Document makes reference to a named standard, the relevant version of

the standard is the one listed at the end of the publication. However, if this version has been revised or updated by the issuing standards

body, the new version may be used as a source of guidance provided it continues to address

the relevant requirements of the Regulations.

The appropriate use of a product which

complies with a European Technical Approval as defined in the Construction Products

Directive will meet the relevant requirements.

The Office intends to issue periodic

amendments to its Approved Documents to reflect emerging harmonised European

Standards. Where a national standard is to be replaced by a European harmonised standard, there will be a co-existence period during

which either standard may be referred to. At

the end of the co-existence period the national standard will be withdrawn.

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

In mixed use developments part of a building may be used as a dwelling while another part has a non-domestic use. In such cases, if the requirements of the Regulations for dwellings and non-domestic use differ, the requirements for non-domestic use should apply in any

shared parts of the building.

THE WORKPLACE (HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE) REGULATIONS 1992

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 as amended by The Health

and Safety (Miscellaneous Amendments)

Regulations 2002 (SI 2002/2174) contain some requirements which affect building design. The main requirements are now covered by the

Building Regulations, but for further information see: ‘Workplace health, safety and welfare.

Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare)

Regulations 1992, Approved Code of Practice’ L24. Published by HSE Books 1992 (ISBN 0

7176 0413 6).

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare)

Regulations 1992 apply to the common parts of flats and similar buildings if people such as cleaners and caretakers are employed to work in these common parts. Where the

requirements of the Building Regulations that are covered by this Part do not apply to

buildings other than dwellings, the provisions may still be required in the situations

described above in order to satisfy the Workplace Regulations.

The Requirements

This Approved Document, which takes effect

on 1 January 2005, deals with the requirements of Part P of Schedule 1 to the Building

Regulations 2000 (as amended by SI 2004/3210).

Requirement

Limits on application

PART P ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Design, installation, inspection and testing

P1. Reasonable provision shall be made in the design, installation, inspection and testing of electrical installations in order to protect persons from fire or injury.

Provision of information

P2. Sufficient information shall be provided so that persons wishing to operate, maintain or alter an electrical installation can do so with reasonable safety.

The requirements of this Part apply only to electrical installations that are intended to operate at low or extra- low voltage and are—

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

in a dwelling;

in the common parts of a building serving one or more dwellings, but excluding power supplies to lifts;

in a building that receives its electricity from a source located within or shared with a dwelling; and

in a garden or in or on land associated with a building where the electricity is from a source located within or shared with a dwelling.

NOTES

Examples of application of Part P

Part P applies to electrical installations in buildings or parts of buildings comprising:

  • dwelling houses and flats;
  • dwellings and business premises that have a common supply – for example shops and public houses with a flat

above;

  • common access areas in blocks of flats such as corridors and staircases;
  • shared amenities of blocks of flats such as laundries and gymnasiums.

Part P applies also to parts of the above electrical installations:

  • in or on land associated with the

buildings – for example Part P applies to fixed lighting and pond pumps in

gardens;

  • in outbuildings such as sheds, detached garages and greenhouses.

Changes to the Building Regulations 2000 (as amended by SI 2004/3210)

Interpretation (regulation 2)

Regulation 2 is amended to explain the Limit on Application in Schedule 1, Part P and to

include fixed electrical installations in relation to which Part P imposes a requirement:

  • The definition of ‘Controlled service or fitting’ in regulation 2 is changed to:

‘Controlled service or fitting means a

service or fitting in relation to which Part G, H, J, L or P of Schedule 1 imposes a requirement.’

  • Definitions of ‘electrical installation’, ‘low voltage’ and ‘extra-low voltage’ are

added.

Requirements relating to material change of use (regulation 6)

Regulation 6(1)(a) is amended to include Part P so that, when relevant, work in connection with a material change of use must comply with the technical requirements in Part P.

Limitation on requirements (regulation 8)

Regulation 8 is amended to include Part P so

that work covered by Part P is only needed for the purpose of securing reasonable standards of health and safety.

Exempt buildings and work (regulation 9)

Regulation 9 is amended so that the

requirements of Part P apply to electrical

installations in any greenhouse, small detached building, conservatory, porch, covered yard or way, and car port open on at least two sides.

Giving of a building notice or deposit of plans (regulation 12)

Regulation 12 is amended so that a person intending to carry out electrical work is not

required to give a building notice or deposit full plans if:

  • registered with one of the Part P self-

certification schemes listed in Schedule 2A; or

  • carrying out electrical work of a nature described in Schedule 2B.
Provisions applicable to self-certification schemes (regulation 16A)

Regulation 16A is amended to put an obligation on a competent person registered with a Part P self-certification scheme to provide a self-

certification certificate to the occupier and a notice to that effect (or a copy of the

certificate) to the local authority not more than 30 days after completion of the work.

Interaction with other Parts of the Building Regulations

Other Parts of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations contain requirements affecting

electrical installations. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Part A (Structure): depth of chases in walls, and size of holes and notches in floor and roof joists;
  • Part B (Fire safety): fire safety of certain electrical installations; provision of fire alarm and fire detection systems; fire

resistance of penetrations through floors and walls;

  • Part C (Site preparation and resistance to moisture): moisture resistance of cable

penetrations through external walls;

  • Part E (Resistance to the passage of

sound): penetrations through floors and walls;

  • Part F (Ventilation): ventilation rates for dwellings;
  • Part L (Conservation of fuel and power): energy efficient lighting; reduced current- carrying capacity of cables in insulation;
  • Part M (Access to and use of buildings): heights of switches and socket outlets.

Further guidance is available from the IEE (Institution of Electrical Engineers) at

www.iee.org/Publish/WireRegs/IEE_Building_Re gs.pdf. The NICEIC (National Inspection

Council for Electrical Installation Contracting) and the ECA (Electrical Contractors’

Association) have also published the ‘Electrical Installers’ Guide to the Building Regulations’

available from www.niceic.org.uk or www.eca.co.uk.

Regulation 4(2) states that, on completion of the work, the building should be no worse in

terms of the level of compliance with the other applicable Parts of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations. For example, one or more

perforations of a ceiling lining beneath a floor – made to accommodate recessed lighting or

similar fittings – may have an adverse effect on that floor’s performance in terms of its

resistance to fire and sound penetration. Due regard should therefore be paid to the

guidance in Approved Documents B and E on the performance of compartment floors.

Section 0:

GENERAL GUIDANCE

Performance

    1. In the Secretary of State’s view, the

requirements will be met by adherence to the ‘Fundamental Principles’ for achieving safety given in BS 7671: 2001 Chapter 13. To

achieve these requirements electrical installations must be:

      1. designed and installed to afford appropriate protection against

mechanical and thermal damage, and so that they do not present electric

shock and fire hazards to people;

      1. suitably inspected and tested to verify that they meet the relevant equipment and installation standards.

General

    1. A way of satisfying the fundamental principles would be to follow:
      1. the technical rules described in the body of BS 7671: 2001, or an

equivalent standard approved by a member of the EEA that includes

issuing an electrical installation

certificate to the person ordering the work; and

      1. guidance given in installation manuals that are consistent with BS 7671:

2001, such as:

        1. the IEE (Institution of Electrical Engineers) On-Site Guide;
        2. the series of IEE Publications, Guidance Notes Nos 1 to 7.
    1. The diagrams in Appendix A give an

indication of the sorts of electrical services encountered in dwellings, some of the ways

they can be connected and the complexity of

the wiring and protective systems necessary to supply them. They are intended as an

indication of the scope of Part P for those who are not electricians; they must not be used for installation purposes.

Definitions

    1. The following meanings apply throughout this document:

Electrical installation is defined in BS 76711 as ‘an assembly of associated electrical

equipment supplied from a common origin to

fulfil a specific purpose and having certain co- ordinated characteristics.’ For the purposes of Building Regulations an electrical installation

Extra-low voltage is defined in BS 7671 as ‘normally not exceeding 50 V ac or 120 V ripple- free dc, whether between conductors or to earth.’

Low voltage is defined in BS 7671 as ‘normally exceeding extra-low voltage but not exceeding 1000 V ac or 1500 V dc between conductors,

or 600 V ac or 900 V dc between conductors and earth.’

Kitchen is defined in the Building Regulations as ‘a room or part of a room which contains a sink and food preparation facilities’.

As a guide only, in open plan areas the zone of a kitchen may be considered to extend from the edge of the sink to a distance of 3m or to a

nearer dividing wall.

Other Regulations

    1. Electrical work is also affected by the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 as

amended and the Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002 as amended, as

described in paragraphs 3.1 to 3.13.

Notification of work

    1. The requirements apply to all electrical installation work.

When necessary to involve building control bodies

    1. Except in the circumstances outlined in paragraph 0.8 below, notification of proposals to carry out electrical installation work must be given to a building control body before work begins.

When not necessary to involve building control bodies

    1. It is not necessary to give prior

notification of proposals to carry out electrical installation work to building control bodies in the following circumstances:

      1. The proposed installation work is undertaken by a person2 who is a

competent person registered with an electrical self-certification scheme

authorised by the Secretary of State.

In these cases the person is

responsible for ensuring compliance with BS 7671: 2001 and all relevant Building Regulations. On completion of the work, the person ordering the

work should receive a signed Building Regulations self-certification

certificate, and the relevant building

control body should receive a copy of the information on the certificate. The person ordering the work should also receive a duly completed Electrical

means fixed electrical cables or fixed electrical

equipment located on the consumer’s side of the electricity supply meter.

1 BS 7671: 2001 Part 2

2 ‘Person’ means a legal person, ie a firm or an individual

Installation Certificate as or similar to the model in BS 76713 (see

paragraphs 1.6 to 1.12). As required by BS 7671, the certificate must be made out and signed by the

competent person or persons who

carried out the design, construction, inspection and testing work. Copies of relevant BS 7671: 2001 model

forms are shown in Appendix B.

OR

      1. The proposed electrical installation work is non-notifiable work of the

type described in Table 1 and does not include the provision of a new circuit.

        1. When the non-notifiable work described in Table 1 is to be

undertaken professionally, a way of showing compliance would be to follow BS 7671: 2001 and to

issue to the person ordering the work a Minor Electrical

Installation Works Certificate as or similar to the model in BS 76713

(see paragraphs 1.6 to 1.12). A copy of this form is shown in

Appendix B. As required by BS 7671, the certificate must be made out and signed by a

competent person in respect of the inspection and testing of an installation. The competent

person need not necessarily be a

person registered with an electrical self-certification

scheme, and may be a third party.

        1. When the non-notifiable work described in Table 1 is to be undertaken by a DIY worker, a

way of showing compliance would be to follow the IEE guidance or

guidance in other authoritative manuals that are based on this, and to have a competent person inspect and test the work and

supply a Minor Electrical

Installation Works Certificate. The competent person need not

necessarily be registered with an electrical self-certification scheme but, as required by BS 7671, must be competent in respect of the

inspection and testing of an installation.

        1. In any event, non-notifiable works should be drawn to the attention of the person carrying out

subsequent work or periodic

inspections. A way of doing this would be to supply Minor

Electrical Installation Works

Certificates covering the additions and alterations made since the

original construction of the

installation or since the most recent periodic inspection.

Table 1: Work that need not be notified to building control bodies

Work consisting of:

Replacing any electrical fitting including socket-outlets, control switches and ceiling roses Replacing the cable for a single circuit only, where damaged, for example, by fire, rodent or impact (a) Re-fixing or replacing the enclosures of existing installation components (b)

Providing mechanical protection to existing fixed installations (c)

Work that is not in a kitchen or special location and does not involve a special installation (d) and consists of:

Adding lighting points (light fittings and switches) to an existing circuit (e) Adding socket-outlets and fused spurs to an existing ring or radial circuit (e) Installing or upgrading main or supplementary equipotential bonding (f)

Work not in a special location on:

Telephone or extra-low voltage wiring and equipment for the purposes of communications, information technology, signalling, control and similar purposes

Notes

  1. On condition that the replacement cable has the same current carrying capacity, follows the same route and does not serve more than one sub-circuit through a distribution board.
  2. If the circuit’s protective measures are unaffected.
  3. If the circuit’s protective measures and current-carrying capacity of conductors are unaffected by increased thermal insulation.
  4. Special locations and installations are listed in Table 2.
  5. Only if the existing circuit protective device is suitable and provides protection for the modified circuit, and other relevant safety provisions are satisfactory.
  6. Such work shall comply with other applicable legislation, such as the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations.

3 BS 7671: 2001 Appendix 6

Table 2: Special locations and installations (a)

Special locations:

Locations containing a bath tub or shower basin Swimming pools or paddling pools

Hot air saunas

Special installations:

Electric floor or ceiling heating systems Garden lighting or power installations

Solar photovoltaic (PV) power supply systems Small scale generators such as microCHP units

Extra-low voltage lighting installations, other than pre-assembled, CE-marked lighting sets

Notes

    1. See IEE Guidance Note 7 which gives more guidance on achieving safe installations where risks to people are greater.

DESIGN, INSTALLATION, INSPECTION AND TESTING

General

    1. Where electrical installation work is to be carried out professionally, compliance is

necessary with the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 as amended.

    1. Electrical installations should be

designed and installed, suitably enclosed and separated by appropriate distances to provide mechanical and thermal protection, so that

they incorporate measures that afford

appropriate protection for persons against the risks of electric shock, burn or fire injuries.

    1. The Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002 require the

electricity distributor to install the cut-out and meter in a safe location, where they are

mechanically protected and can be safely maintained. In compliance with this

requirement, the electricity distributor and

installer may be required to take into account the risk of flooding4.

    1. In accordance with the Electricity Safety,

Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002 and the contract for a mains supply, proposals for new installations or significant alterations to existing ones must be agreed with the

electricity distributor.

Accessibility

    1. Wall-mounted switches and socket- outlets should be located so that they are easily reachable where this is necessary to

comply with Part M of the Building Regulations.

Approved Document M shows ways of

complying. Accessible consumer units should be fitted with a child-proof cover or installed in a lockable cupboard.

Inspection and testing before taking into service

    1. Electrical installations should be

inspected and tested during and at the end of installation, before they are taken into service, to verify that they are reasonably safe, that is to say that they comply with BS 7671: 2001.

    1. A way of demonstrating this compliance would be to follow the procedures in Chapter 74 of BS 7671: 2001, and to supply:
      1. to the person ordering the work

copies of the forms called for, signed by a person competent to do so; and

      1. in the case of a competent person registered with an electrical self-

certification scheme, to the building

control body a declaration that compliance with the Building

Regulations has been achieved.

    1. The forms called for in paragraph 1.7a. above should show that the electrical

installation work has been:

      1. Inspected (this is necessary during

erection as well as on completion) to verify that the components are:

        1. made in compliance with

appropriate British Standards or harmonised European Standards;

        1. selected and installed in accordance with BS 7671

(including consideration of

external influences such as the presence of moisture);

        1. not visibly damaged or defective so as to be unsafe.
      1. Tested to check satisfactory

performance in relation to continuity of conductors, insulation resistance, separation of circuits, polarity,

earthing and bonding arrangements, earth fault loop impedance and

functionality of all protective devices including residual current devices.

    1. Section 712 of BS 7671: 2001 provides a list of all the inspections that may be necessary although in particular cases only some

elements may be relevant. A schedule of

inspections is given in Appendix 6 of BS 7671, and a copy is included in this Approved

Document at Appendix B.

    1. Section 713 of BS 7671: 2001 provides a list of all the tests that may be necessary

although in particular cases only some

elements may be relevant. A blank schedule of test results is given in Appendix 6 of BS 7671, and a copy is included in this Approved

Document at Appendix B. Tests should be carried out using appropriate and accurate

instruments under the conditions given in BS 7671, and the results should be recorded on

forms like the model in Appendix 6 of BS 7671.

The results should be compared with the relevant performance criteria to confirm compliance.

    1. The inspection and testing of DIY work should meet the above requirements.

4 Some guidance is given in the ODPM publication

Preparing for Floods, available from www.odpm.gov.uk

Model certificates

    1. Electrical installation certificates modelled on those in BS 7671: 2001 are

available from the IEE 5 and other sources, and model forms are given at Appendix B. They

cover works ranging in scope from minor works to large projects such as blocks of flats. In

particular cases the most appropriate form should be used and signed by the person

responsible for carrying out the works, that is

to say the design, construction, inspection and testing.

5 www.iee.org/Publish/WireRegs/forms.cfm

EXTENSIONS, MATERIAL ALTERATIONS AND MATERIAL CHANGES OF USE

    1. Where any electrical installation work is classified as an extension, a material alteration or a material change of use, the addition and

alteration work must include:

      1. such works on the existing fixed

electrical installation in the building as are necessary to enable the additions and alterations, the circuits which

feed them, the protective measures

and the relevant earthing and bonding systems to meet the requirements;

and

      1. establishing that the mains supply equipment is suitable.
    1. A way of complying would be to follow

the guidance given above in relation to design and installation and to show that for the altered circumstances:

      1. the rating and the condition of the

existing equipment belonging to both the consumer and to the electricity

distributor:

        1. can carry the additional loads being allowed for, or
        2. are improved so that they can carry the additional loads being allowed for; and
      1. the correct protective measures are used; and
      2. the earthing and equipotential bonding arrangements are

satisfactory.

    1. Appendix C offers guidance on some of the types of older installations that might be encountered in alteration work.
    2. Appendix D offers guidance on applying the harmonised European cable identification system when making additions and alterations to existing installations.

Section 3:

INFORMATION ABOUT OTHER LEGISLATION

Electricity at Work Regulations 1989

    1. All electrical installations must be accommodated in ways that meet the

requirements of the Building Regulations.

However electrical installations carried out by persons on whom duties are imposed by the

Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 must meet the requirements of those Regulations.

    1. The advice given below reflects the present state of the Electricity at Work

Regulations 1989 following amendments by Statutory Instruments 1996/192, 1997/1993 and 1999/2024.

    1. Regulation 3 imposes duties on

employers, employees and the self-employed. Regulation 3(2)(b) places duties on employees equivalent to those placed on employers and

self-employed persons where there are matters within their control.

    1. The text of the Electricity at Work

Regulations and guidance on how to comply with them are contained in the Health and

Safety guidance document ‘Memorandum of

Guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 – HSR25’. Important elements of the

Regulations include:

      1. The Electricity at Work Regulations require that electrical work is only carried out by persons that are competent to prevent danger and injury while doing it, or who are appropriately supervised (Regulation 16).
      2. The Electricity at Work Regulations set general requirements for the

design, construction and suitability of equipment for its intended use

(Regulations 4(1), 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,

11, 12).

Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002

    1. The Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002 (Statutory Instrument 2002/2665) came into force on 31 January 2003. These Regulations replaced the Electricity Supply Regulations 1988 (as amended).
    2. The Regulations specify safety standards which are aimed at protecting the general

public from danger. In addition, the Regulations specify power quality and supply continuity

requirements to ensure an efficient and economic electricity supply service for

consumers and specified persons. Most of the duties apply to distributors who own or operate networks used to supply consumers’

installations, street furniture or other networks.

    1. Amongst other duties, distributors are required to provide an earthing facility for new connections (unless this would be inappropriate for safety reasons), to maintain the supply within defined tolerance limits and to provide certain technical and safety information to consumers to enable them to design their installations.
    2. Distributors and meter operators must ensure that their equipment on consumers’

premises is suitable for its purpose and safe in its particular environment and that the polarity of conductors is clearly indicated.

    1. The Regulations allow the Secretary of State to issue safety enforcement notices to

consumers in circumstances where consumers’ installations outside buildings present a danger to the public.

    1. In relation to ‘embedded’ generation6 , the Regulations require persons operating ‘switched alternative’ sources of energy in their installations to prevent a parallel connection occurring with the distributor’s network and to comply with BS 7671. Sources of energy that operate in parallel with the distributor’s network must meet certain additional safety standards: for example the equipment must not be a source of danger or cause interference with the distributor’s network. Persons installing domestic combined heat and power equipment must advise the local distributor of their intentions before or at the time of commissioning the source.
    2. Distributors are prevented by the Regulations from connecting installations to their networks which do not comply with BS 7671. Other persons may connect installations to distributors’ networks providing they obtain the prior consent of the distributor, who may require evidence that the installation complies with BS 7671 and that the connection itself will meet safety and operational requirements. Distributors may disconnect consumers’ installations which are a source of danger or cause interference with their networks or other installations.
    3. Detailed Guidance on the Regulations is available at www.dti.gov.uk/electricity-regulations.

Functionality requirements

    1. Part P of the Building Regulations makes requirements covering the safety of fixed electrical installations, but does not cover system functionality. The functionality of electrically powered systems such as fire alarm systems, fans and pumps is covered in other Parts of the Building Regulations and other legislation.

consumers. The Regulations were introduced to

improve standards in public safety and to align requirements to modern electricity markets.

3.7 The duty holders are generators, distributors, suppliers, meter operators,

6 ‘Embedded’ generators are those connected to the distribution networks of public electricity suppliers rather than directly to the National Grid. Most CHP and renewable generating stations are embedded.

Appendix A: Examples of electrical

installation diagrams

Notes

  1. The diagrams do not give all the

information needed to achieve compliance with BS 7671, nor do they cover all the electrical

services found in dwellings, some of which (eg swimming pools and saunas) are subject to

special requirements specified in Part 6 of BS 7671: 2001. The diagrams must not be used for installation purposes.

  1. The diagrams are simplified examples of what may be encountered. They are not a

substitute for the proper consideration of for instance:

    1. Cross-sectional areas (csa) of the phase and neutral conductors of

circuits. The minimum csa required by BS 7671 depends on a number of

variables, including: type of cable, number of cores, type and nominal current of overcurrent protective

device, grouping with other circuits, ambient temperature, contact with

thermally insulating materials, and circuit length.

    1. Cross-sectional areas of protective conductors. BS 7671 contains

different rules, involving a number of variables, for determining the

minimum csa for each type of

protective conductor, including the

earthing conductor, circuit protective conductors, main equipotential

bonding conductors, and

supplementary bonding conductors.

    1. Types and nominal current ratings of fuses or circuit breakers. These

particulars depend on the circuit design current and load

characteristics, and need to be co- ordinated with the circuit conductors and with the earth fault loop

impedance of the circuit.

    1. Types of wiring or wiring system. While PVC insulated and sheathed cables are likely to be suitable for much of the wiring in a typical

dwelling, other types of cable may

also be necessary. For example, heat- resisting flexible cables are required

for the final connections to certain

equipment; the cable to the garage or shed, if run underground, is subject to certain requirements; and cables

concealed in floors and walls in

certain circumstances are required to have an earthed metal covering, be

enclosed in steel conduit, or have additional mechanical protection.

    1. Principles of cable routing. BS 7671 contains criteria for the routing and positioning of cables, so as to give

protection against electric shock and fire as a result of mechanical damage to a cable. For example, such criteria are given for cables concealed in

walls or buried in the ground.

    1. Current ratings of circuits to fixed current-using equipment such as a shower or cooker.
In the above context, diagrams are given as follows:

Diagram 1(a) indicates the many electrical

appliances that can be found in the home and how they might be supplied.

Diagram 1(b) indicates earthing and bonding arrangements that can be necessary.

Diagram 2(a) indicates earthing arrangements as might be provided by electricity distributors.

Diagram 2(b) indicates the earthing

arrangement as might need to be provided by the consumer.

Key to Diagrams

Diagram 1(a): Illustration of the fixed electrical installation that might be commonly encountered in new or upgraded existing dwellings

Notes:

      1. See the general rules in BS 7671: 2001.
      2. The RCD component in the main switch is required for TT systems (see Diagram 2(b)). Individual circuit 30 mA RCDs may be required to avoid unnecessary tripping.
      3. The notices include advice on periodic testing and regular test operation of the RCDs.
      4. The zone shown around the bath or shower corresponds to zone 3 in Section 601 of BS 7671: 2001. The socket-outlet shown in the bedroom with the shower cubicle must be outside zone 3.

See Diagrams 2(a) and 2(b) for details of earth termination arrangement

Diagram 1(b): Illustration of the earthing and bonding conductors that might be part of the electrical installation shown in Diagram 1(a)

Notes:

  1. See the general rules in BS 7671: 2001.
  2. Circuit protective conductors are taken to all items of fixed electrical equipment and local isolation and switching devices which appear in Diagram 1(a).
  3. In the case of a protective multiple earthing (PME) supply (see Diagram 2(a)), consult the electricity distributor.
  4. Supplementary bonding is required in bathrooms to an extent dependent upon the presence of metallic fixtures, fittings and pipework: see Section 601 of BS 7671: 2001.
               

Notes:

Diagram 2(a): Example earthing arrangement where the electricity distributor provides the earth connection (referred to as TN-C-S where the connection is made to A, or TN-S where the connection is made to B – the most common systems in urban areas)

    1. Connection A shows the arrangement where an electricity distributor provides a combined protective earthing and neutral conductor as part of a protective multiple earthing system (referred to as TN-C-S).

Connection B shows the arrangement where an electricity distributor provides a protective earthing conductor (usually the metallic covering of the supply cable) that is separate from the neutral conductor (as part of a system referred to as TN-S).

    1. Connections A or B can only be made by the electricity distributor or its appointed agent.

Diagram 2(b): Example earthing arrangement where consumers provide their own earthing connection (referred to as a TT system)

Notes:

  1. BS 7671: 2001 requires that the part of the installation between the origin and the first RCD shall comply with the requirements for protection by Class II equipment or equivalent insulation. For the arrangement shown, this applies to the consumer unit and the wiring connecting it to the supplier’s equipment.
  2. The 100 mA RCD component of the main switch should be of the time delayed type.

Appendix B: Copies of BS 7671 and IEE

model forms

The BS 7671 and IEE forms and notes on the following pages are taken from IEE Guidance Note 3, 2002 edition, and are available for

downloading from the IEE website at

www.iee.org/Publish/WireRegs/forms.cfm. They appear in the order:

Introduction

    1. Introduction to Appendix 6 of BS 7671: 2001 (Model forms for certification and

reporting)

Initial inspection and testing

    1. Notes for short form and full versions of Electrical Installation Certificate
    2. Form 1 – Short form of Electrical

Installation Certificate (for use when one person is responsible for the design,

construction, inspection and testing of an

installation), including guidance for recipients

    1. Form 2 – Full Electrical Installation

Certificate, including guidance for recipients (standard form from Appendix 6 of BS 7671)

    1. Form 3 – Schedule of Inspections (from Appendix 6 of BS 7671) with notes
    2. Form 4 – Schedule of Test Results (from Appendix 6 of BS 7671) with notes

Minor works

    1. Notes on completion of Minor Electrical Installation Works Certificate
    2. Form 5 – Minor Electrical Installation Works Certificate, including guidance for recipients (from Appendix 6 of

BS 7671)

INTRODUCTION

CERTIFICATION AND REPORTING

  1. The Electrical Installation Certificate required by Part 7 of BS 7671 shall be made out and signed or otherwise authenticated by a competent person or persons in respect of the design, construction, inspection and testing of the work.
  2. The Minor Works Certificate required by Part 7 of BS 7671 shall be made out and

signed or otherwise authenticated by a competent person in respect of the inspection and testing of an installation.

  1. The Periodic Inspection Report required by Part 7 of BS 7671 shall be made out and signed or otherwise authenticated by a competent person in respect of the inspection and testing of an installation.
  2. Competent persons will, as appropriate to their function under (i) (ii) and (iii) above,

have a sound knowledge and experience relevant to the nature of the work undertaken and to the technical standards set down in this British Standard, be fully versed in the inspection and testing procedures contained in this Standard and employ adequate

testing equipment.

  1. Electrical Installation Certificates will indicate the responsibility for design,

construction, inspection and testing, whether in relation to new work or further work on an existing installation.

Where design, construction and inspection and testing is the responsibility of one

person a Certificate with a single signature declaration in the form shown below may replace the multiple signatures section of the model form.

FOR DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, INSPECTION & TESTING.

I being the person responsible for the Design, Construction, Inspection & Testing of the electrical installation (as indicated by my signature below), particulars of which are described above, having exercised reasonable skill and care when

carrying out the Design, Construction, Inspection & Testing, hereby CERTIFY that the said work for which I have been responsible is to the best of my knowledge

and belief in accordance with BS 7671 : ………., amended to (date) except

for the departures, if any, detailed as follows.

  1. A Minor Works Certificate will indicate the responsibility for design, construction, inspection and testing of the work described in Part 4 of the certificate.
  2. A Periodic Inspection Report will indicate the responsibility for the inspection and testing of an installation within the extent and limitations specified on the report.
  3. A schedule of inspections and a schedule of test results as required by Part 7 (of BS 7671) shall be issued with the associated Electrical Installation Certificate or Periodic Inspection Report.
  4. When making out and signing a form on behalf of a company or other business entity, individuals shall state for whom they are acting.
  5. Additional forms may be required as clarification, if needed by non-technical persons, or in expansion, for larger or more complex installations.
  6. The IEE Guidance Note 3 provides further information on inspection and testing on completion and for periodic inspections.

ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION CERTIFICATES NOTES FOR FORMS 1 AND 2

  1. The Electrical Installation Certificate is to be used only for the initial certification of a new installation or for an alteration or addition to an existing installation where new circuits have been introduced.

It is not to be used for a Periodic Inspection for which a Periodic Inspection Report form should be used. For an alteration or addition which does not extend to the introduction of new circuits, a Minor Electrical Installation Works Certificate may be used.

The original Certificate is to be given to the person ordering the work (Regulation 742-01-03). A duplicate should be retained by the contractor.

  1. This Certificate is only valid if accompanied by the Schedule of Inspections and the Schedule(s) of Test Results.
  2. The signatures appended are those of the persons authorised by the companies executing the work of design, construction and inspection and testing respectively. A signatory authorised to certify more than one category of work should sign in each of the appropriate places.
  3. The time interval recommended before the first periodic inspection must be inserted (see IEE Guidance Note 3 for guidance).
  4. The page numbers for each of the Schedules of Test Results should be indicated, together with the total number of sheets involved.
  5. The maximum prospective fault current recorded should be the greater of either the short-circuit current or the earth fault current.
  6. The proposed date for the next inspection should take into consideration the frequency and quality of maintenance that the installation can reasonably be expected to receive during its intended life, and the period should be agreed between the designer, installer and other relevant parties.

Form 1 Form No /1

ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE (notes 1 and 2)

(REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS – BS 7671 [IEE WIRING REGULATIONS])

DETAILS OF THE CLIENT (note 1)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

INSTALLATION ADDRESS

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………….Postcode ……………………………………………………..

DESCRIPTION AND EXTENT OF THE INSTALLATION Tick boxes as appropriate

Description of installation: ……………………………………………………………………..

Extent of installation covered by this Certificate: ………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

New installation

Addition to an

existing installation

Alteration to an

existing installation

FOR DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, INSPECTION & TESTING

I being the person responsible for the Design, Construction, Inspection & Testing of the electrical installation (as indicated by my signature below), particulars of which are described above, having exercised reasonable skill and care when carrying out the Design, Construction, Inspection & Testing, hereby CERTIFY that the said work for which I have been responsible is to the best of my knowledge and belief in accordance with BS 7671 : ……., amended to (date) except for the

departures, if any, detailed as follows:

Details of departures from BS 7671 (Regulations 120-01-03, 120-02):

The extent of liability of the signatory is limited to the work described above as the subject of this Certificate.

Name (IN BLOCK LETTERS):…………………………………………………… Position: ……………………………………………………….

Signature (note 3): ……………………………………………………………….. Date:…………………………………………………………….

For and on behalf of: …………………………………………………………….

Address: ………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………….Postcode ……………… Tel No: …………………………………………………………

NEXT INSPECTION

I recommend that this installation is further inspected and tested after an interval of not more than years/months

(notes 4 and 7)

SUPPLY CHARACTERISTICS AND EARTHING ARRANGEMENTS Tick boxes and enter details, as appropriate

Earthing arrangements

TN-C TN-S TN-C-S TT

IT

Number and Type of Live Conductors

a.c. d.c

1-phase, 2-wire 2-pole

  1. phase, 3-wire 3-pole
  2. phase, 3-wire other 3-phase, 3-wire
  3. phase, 4-wire

Nature of Supply Parameters

Nominal voltage, U/Uo(1) V

Nominal frequency, f (1) Hz

Prospective fault current, Ipf (2) (note 6) kA

External loop impedance, Ze (2) 

(Note: (1) by enquiry, (2) by enquiry or by measurement)

Supply Protective Device Characteristics

Type: ……………………..

…………………………….

Nominal current rating

…………………………..A

Alternative source

of supply (to be detailed on attached schedules)

PARTICULARS OF INSTALLATION REFERRED TO IN THE CERTIFICATE Tick boxes and enter details, as appropriate

Means of Earthing

Maximum Demand

Distributor’s facility

Maximum demand (load) Amps per phase

Installation

earth electrode

Details of Installation Earth Electrode (where applicable)

Type Location Electrode resistance to earth (e.g. rod(s), tape etc)

………………………….. ……………………………… ……………………………………….

Main Protective Conductors

Earthing conductor: material ………………………. csa …………………………..mm2 connection verified Main equipotential

bonding conductors material ………………………. csa …………………………..mm2 connection verified

To incoming water and/or gas service To other elements ………………………………………………………………

Main Switch or Circuit-breaker

BS, Type …………………….. No. of poles ……………… Current rating ………………A Voltage rating V

Location ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. Fuse rating or setting A

Rated residual operating current I n = …………………. mA, and operating time of ms (at I n)

(applicable only where an RCD is suitable and is used as a main circuit-breaker)

COMMENTS ON EXISTING INSTALLATION: (In the case of an alteration or additions see Section 743)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………………………………………………………